The Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony


Accounts of SBAwith the American Anti-Slavery Society [17 December 1856-12 January 1857]

[verso]
1856, Cr.
Bro't Forward, 168.84
Dec. 19, Joseph Savage[1], 5.00
[Dec.] 22, Frances Jackson, 50.00
[total] 223.84
[recto]
Dr.
Bro't Forward, 132.01
Dec. 17, Ogd[ensburg] to Watertown S. B & P., 5.85
[Dec. 17], C. L. Remond, 14.00
[Dec.] 18, Woodruff Hotel, 3.00
[Dec. 18], Watertown to Rome, 4.16
[Dec. 18], Omnibus & Baggage, .75
[Dec. 18], Rome to Albany, Powell, 2.60
[Dec. 18], [Rome to] Syracuse S. B., .77
[Dec. 18], Lunch & Carriage, .63
[Dec.] 19, Syracuse to Oswego & return, 2.00
[Dec. 19], Syracuse to Rochester, 1.63
[Dec.] 22, Lunch & Stationary, 1.56
[Dec. 22], 25 Stamp Envelopes, .80
[Dec. 22], C. L. 15 & S. P. Remond $10, 25.00
[Dec.] 24, Stamps & Envelopes, .98
[Dec.] 25, Envelopes & Stamps, 2.00
[Dec.] 31, Postage on Handbills, 1.30
Jan. 2, Rochester to Syracuse, 1.62
[Jan.] 3, Express on 4 Packages P.O., 1.00
[total] 201.66
[verso]
1857, Cr.
Bro't Forward, 223.84
Jan 3, Charles L. Remond, 25.00
[Jan.] 6, M[ethodist] E[piscopal] Church Oswego Door, 9.20
[Jan.] 7, Contributions, 19.13
[Jan.] 8, Door 7th & 8th Evenings, 21.00
[Jan.], Con. to Trust[2], 1.18
[Jan.] 11, Camden Pres[byterian] Church, 3.36
[total] 302.71
[recto]
[Dr.]
Bro't Forward, 201.66
Jan. 3, B. S. Jones, 5.00
[Jan. 3], Tem[perance] House at Syracuse B. S. J E. Jones[3], 3.50
[Jan. 3], [Temperance House] A. M. Powell, 1.50
[Jan. 3], [Temperance House] S. B. Anthony, 2.00
[Jan. 3], [Temperance House] C. L. & S. P. Remond, 4.50
[Jan. 3], Syracuse to Oswego, 1.00
[Jan. 3], Porter for Baggage, .25
[Jan.] 6, Telegraph of Albany Con[vention], 1.56
[Jan. 6], Advertising at Oswego, 2.00
[Jan. 6], Answer to Telegraph, 1.40
[Jan.] 8, M.E. Church Sexton, 6.00
[Jan. 8], Wood & Lights, 7.00
[Jan.] 9, Oswego to Oneida Depot, 6.68
[Jan. 9], A. M. Powell, 20.45
[Jan.] 10, Fare Oneida to Camden, 1.06
[Jan.] 12, Ballance P's expense, 4.52
[Jan. 12], Camden to Rome, 1.04
[Jan. 12], Telegraph to Garrison[4], 1.49
[total] 272.61
Bound volume, pp. 8-11, SBA Papers, DLC. Letters in square brackets expand abbreviations.
    [1.] Joseph Savage (c. 1803-?), a farmer living in Syracuse, supported antislavery work, signed the call to the First National Woman's Rights Convention at Worcester in 1850, and took part in the convention at Syracuse in 1852. On this date, SBA was in Syracuse to arrange for meetings later in the tour. (Federal Census, 1850; Proceedings of Woman's Rights Convention, 1850; Proceedings of Woman's Rights Convention, 1852; Carson League, 31 July 1851.)
    [2.] SBA struck out the words but left the sum in her total.
    [3.] At the Temperance House in Syracuse on 3 January, Benjamin and Elizabeth Jones joined SBA's tour, after lecturing in western New York with Stephen Foster. Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock Jones (1813-1896) was recruited to the antislavery platform as a young woman by Abby Kelley Foster. In 1845 she joined a group of agitators at Salem, Ohio, and married her co-worker Benjamin Smith Jones (1812-1862) in 1846. Benjamin was a Quaker from Philadelphia, a cabinetmaker and aspiring writer, and a friend of John G. Whittier. Together the Joneses edited the Anti-Slavery Bugle until 1849 and helped to build the Western Anti-Slavery Society. Elizabeth Jones participated in the woman's rights convention at Salem in 1850, and by the end of the decade was sought after as a woman's rights lecturer and organizer. She worked in the New York canvass of 1859, she headed the campaign to rewrite Ohio's laws in 1860 and 1861. Benjamin Jones resumed editing the Bugle from 1859 to 1861. (Notable American Women; History, 1:168-70; Sterling, Ahead of Her Time, passim; Garrison, Letters, 3:517.)
    [4.] The tour [Map] continued, to West Winfield and Herkimer, Johnstown and Amsterdam, then to the cities along the Erie Canal, and concluded in Albany on 20 February. Reporting for the Liberator, Garrison praised SBA's "executive talent and sound judgment" in managing the tour and added that her "cogent and impressive manner of address did excellent service." ( Liberator, 6 March 1857.)